1. nikolaecuza:

    danosaurs-and-philions:

    im a bad person who thinks bad thoughts like ‘ew what is that girl wearing’ and then remember that im supposed to be positive about all things and then think ‘no she can wear what she wants, fuck what other people say damn girl u look fabulous’ and im just a teeny bit hypocritical tbh

    I was always taught by my mother, That the first thought that goes through your mind is what you have been conditioned to think. What you think next defines who you are.

  2. "In the final analysis, the term “Judeo-Christian” is nothing
    less than a blatant coup d’état, a forced misappropriation onto
    the face of a new religion of what rightfully belongs to a much
    older one. The term “Judeo-Christian” is therefore not only an
    oxymoron, it is outright sacrilegious, a dishonor to the millions
    of Jews who were tortured or killed for their refusal to convert
    to Christianity, and, by association, wrongfully links the Jewish
    people and its ancient scriptures as accomplices to centuries of
    Christian slaughter and oppression of other indigenous peoples
    as well via Christianity’s sorely misguided and misapplied
    interpretation of the “Old Testament.”"

    Gershon Winkler, The Judeo-Christian Fiction (2008) Lulu Press. (via here-lies-andalusia)

    Exactly.

    (via thearcanetheory)

    "Judeo-Christian"—another phrase to add the "never, ever say in discourse with Jews" list.

    (via this-is-not-jewish)

  3. "start ignoring people who threaten your joy.
    literally, ignore them.
    say nothing.
    don’t invite any parts of them into your space."
    Alex Elle (via alexandraelle)
  4. micdotcom:

The magnitude of the California drought — in one GIF 

The stunning images above shows the effects of California’s drought on Lake Oroville State Recreation Area, a state park north of Sacramento. 
The photographs were taken three years apart: the green and hydrated version in 2011 and its parched sister in 2014. The lake has frequently been cited as a prime example of the drought’s destruction: “Currently at 32% of its total 3,537,577 acre feet,” the caption reads. 
The sky-is-falling headlines are no joke | Follow micdotcom

    micdotcom:

    The magnitude of the California drought — in one GIF 

    The stunning images above shows the effects of California’s drought on Lake Oroville State Recreation Area, a state park north of Sacramento. 

    The photographs were taken three years apart: the green and hydrated version in 2011 and its parched sister in 2014. The lake has frequently been cited as a prime example of the drought’s destruction: “Currently at 32% of its total 3,537,577 acre feet,” the caption reads. 

    The sky-is-falling headlines are no joke | Follow micdotcom

  5. "Let go of certainty. The opposite isn’t uncertainty. It’s openness, curiosity and a willingness to embrace paradox, rather than choose up sides. The ultimate challenge is to accept ourselves exactly as we are, but never stop trying to learn and grow."
    Tony Schwartz (via floatingonatidalwave)
  6. "

    SEE THE THING IS, he said, BIG GIRLS LEAVE MORE SPACE FOR ME TO GRAB AHOLD OF
    but
    i’m not your handlebars

    SEE THE THING IS, she said, BIG GIRLS ARE BETTER THAN SKINNY ONES BECAUSE MEN DON’T LIKE BONES
    but
    other girls are not graveyards

    SEE THE THING IS
    a baby girl isn’t beautiful because somebody is gonna hold her
    i mean we all wanna be loved but i want her to
    love herself
    first

    a baby girl isn’t beautiful because a man’s fingertips can dig
    bruises into her hips, she’s beautiful because
    she just is

    in nature we don’t say a flower is beautiful
    when somebody wants to pick it

    in fact we say that nature’s beauty is at the height of purity
    when it would destroy you to even touch it

    SEE THE THING IS
    i would rather be an ocean of danger and deep black and
    thick mermaid thighs rather than
    a body you want to cruise across
    i would rather be the night sky and crush ribs with a suffocating sense that we are all small and purposeless
    rather than a landscape of freckles someone happens to think
    are akin to constellations
    i would rather be storms and lightning and a bright sun rising, i
    would rather make you quake in your boots than get your heart
    pounding,

    i would rather be beautiful like a cold spring stream:
    not beautiful because you said so
    but beautiful because
    i am me.

    "
    Don’t really wanna be your girl? Just wanna belong to me? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ /// r.i.d (via inkskinned)
  7. thewriterchick:

gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?”  

And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 

Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.

I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”

I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.

Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.


(My Son Wears Dresses And That’s OK With Me | Seth Menachem for xoJane)


Can I just say the fact that the little girl’s first reaction was “I’ll tell them to go away” made me tear up?That’s a kid, at such a young age, willing to defend people. That’s a kid who, if her brother wears a dress to school and gets picked on, will run to his side in a minute, regardless of what her friends will say. Oh god the feelings. I can’t handle it.

    thewriterchick:

    gaywrites:

    We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?”  
    And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 
    Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.
    I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”
    I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.
    Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.

    Can I just say the fact that the little girl’s first reaction was “I’ll tell them to go away” made me tear up?

    That’s a kid, at such a young age, willing to defend people. That’s a kid who, if her brother wears a dress to school and gets picked on, will run to his side in a minute, regardless of what her friends will say.

    Oh god the feelings. I can’t handle it.

  8. "

    How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

    Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

    If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

    “You look so healthy!” is a great one.

    Or how about, “you’re looking so strong.”

    “I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

    Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

    Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

    Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

    Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

    Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

    Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

    Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

    Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

    Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

    Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

    Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

    Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

    "

    skoppelkam on Wordpress  (via rabbrakha)

    So much yes in this.

    (via underthecarolinamoon)

  9. POTS & Weight Loss

    livingistogrow:

    Do any other POTSies have flare ups of symptoms when they lose weight?

    I have been largely free of POTS symptoms for around a year now. I’ve recently been working out a lot and eating really well so I’m finally losing weight…and now my symptoms are back with a vengeance. 

    Does this happen to anyone else? Help!

    Any other POTSies have advice?! It’s quite the conundrum

  10. POTS & Weight Loss

    Do any other POTSies have flare ups of symptoms when they lose weight?

    I have been largely free of POTS symptoms for around a year now. I’ve recently been working out a lot and eating really well so I’m finally losing weight…and now my symptoms are back with a vengeance. 

    Does this happen to anyone else? Help!

  11. "start ignoring people who threaten your joy.
    literally, ignore them.
    say nothing.
    don’t invite any parts of them into your space."
    Alex Elle (via alexandraelle)
  12. toocooltobehipster:

    this is so interesting

  13. "But instead of spending our lives running towards our dreams, we are often running away from a fear of failure or a fear of criticism."
    Eric Wright (via tat-art)

About me

Hey there, stranger! I'm Sarah (:


(exists no
miracle mightier than this: to feel)